Ways to Add Impact to Presentations

presentation skills

People often have to give presentations in the work place, so why is it that some presentations are very memorable and others are not?  Do some people just have better presentation skills than others?  Not necessarily.  There are a number of things you can do to add impact to presentations, which will surely leave a lasting impression with an audience.

One of the best ways to make presentations memorable is to incorporate stories and examples.  People have been communicating through stories and examples for centuries.  Just go to a cafe and watch a group of people having a great time.  Chances are, one person told a story, which led to someone else to think of a similar instance, and the same for everyone else in the group.  In this way, stories help bring a group together by connecting through common experiences.  As a presenter, telling a story will bring you closer to your audience.

Another great way to make presentations have that “wow” factor is to add analogies.  Analogies are especially useful in technical presentations.  Why?  Let’s say you’re attempting to explain a concept that you know may be difficult for your audience to understand.  By comparing the concept to something completely unrelated, it can significantly clarify the point.  The best thing to do is to first explain the concept in your industry, and then use the analogy to help explain the point.  That way the analogy is more meaningful when you utilize it.

These are just a couple of ways to add impact to presentations.  Not only does the Fearless Presentations® class go over these and many other ways to add impact, it also allows each participant to practice delivering presentations with these impact ideas in a supportive environment in front of other people.  Just check our schedule of classes for the one nearest you!

Chris McNeany

Chris McNeany is a Vice President and Instructor for the Fearless Presentations® public speaking course. He is based in Los Angeles, California, but he teaches classes in San Diego, San Francisco, Las Vegas, and Seattle as well.

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